It’ll be six months before the cheerful yellow flowers of sunchokes again dance above my head in the Outlaw Garden. These towering plants — also know as Jerusalem artichokes — spend the spring and summer growing tall and green and robust, only to reward us for our patience with sunflower-like blossoms and potato-like tubers after most of the garden is spent and done for the season.

If we want those blooms come autumn — and their tasty tubers for next winter’s meals — we need to start planning ahead now.

I’m working on an ebook about sunchokes — it’ll be similar to the sweet potato guide, with tips on starting your own plants, tending them all season, and harvesting them for use in the kitchen. It’ll be a few weeks at least before I have that guide ready for y’all. But, no need to wait for the full guide to get your sunchokes started. Here’s how I started my first plants — grown from grocery-store-bought roots — several years ago: Sunchokes from store-bought tubers? Hopefully!

If you couldn’t guess, that experiment worked great. I have more sunchokes every year (though I’m careful to keep them contained — sunchokes can spread quickly if you let them roam free in the garden).

Have you tried sunchokes before? If not — or even if so — what would you like to know about growing, harvesting, and landscaping with these edible beauties?

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